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Goodbye!

This is a formal announcement for what should already be apparent – this blog has been discontinued. Thanks for paying us a visit, though! Old posts will still be available, though we will not be tracking any comments left.

For more information on the RSIS Military Studies Programme, please visit our website.

Assoc. Prof. Bernard Loo’s personal blog on strategic affairs and regional security concerns can be found here.

 

 

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Dear readers,

I logged in to this blog, after an absence of 2 years, because there have been a number of comments pending approval over the last few months, and I felt I needed to be fair to those readers who bothered to write in their comments and provide us their insights. For the tardiness, I do apologise.

However, I no longer write for this blog, and my colleagues, with whom I had started this blog, have also since left it inactive.

As such, I would like our readers to know that this blog is to all intents and purposes deactivated. I now write in my own personal blog: bernardloo64.wordpress.com.

I hope to hear from you!

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More on the recent stuxnet issue, this time via The new York Times (available here: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/25/opinion/stuxnet-will-come-back-to-haunt-us.html?hp). Well worth a read.

The NYR is right – this one will almost certainly come back and bite all of us!

Military Studies at RSIS

Yet more offerings on the issue of cyber, security, this time a very sobering analysis of the extent of the vulnerabilities we all currently face. Makes me begin to wonder if Commander Adama might have had a point about not networking the Galactica’s computers. This analysis (available here) is from the BBC.

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Military Studies at RSIS

Evidence suggests that recent computer attacks against Iranian nuclear facilities came from a combined effort between the US and Israel. The report came from the Washington Post (available here). But we should not be surprised: there was a great deal of suspicion that previous attacks suffered by Estonia and Georgia came from Russia (whether directly from state agencies or indirectly or even through ‘concerned private citizens’), so why should we not expect the US and/or Israel, amongst the most vocal of critics of Iran’s nuclear programmes and alleged nuclear weapons ambitions, to orchestrate similar cyber attacks against Iranian nuclear facilities???

Another study (available here) suggests cyberwarfare as a manifestation of the Sunzi ideals of winning without fighting, attacking the enemy unexpectedly, of doing something while apparently doing nothing. I am not so sure about this one though. It is an interesting idea, and Sunzi’s maxims have always captivated…

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Additional reports on the Shalgrila Dialogue (available here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-18313245), updates on the Sino-American dynamic and Asia-Pacific security

Military Studies at RSIS

Interesting analysis, courtesy of the BBC and accessible here. The piece outlines the dominant security issues that will almost certainly be the centre of attention in the coming Shangrila Dialogue.

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A very interesting piece, courtesy of the BBC, which can be accessed here. It shows snipers as very ordinary humans, who tend to think of the people they have killed as human beings (rather than dehumanising them as animals or machines).

This piece brings out a whole range of issues. SLA Marshall’s Men Under Fire – which argued that most soldiers never discharge their weapons they way they were trained to do, and that most soldiers can go through entire wars without ever knowing that they actually killed an enemy combatant – comes immediately to mind. The portrayal of the Somalis in the film Blackhawk Down, which was criticised by some scholars, as nameless masses also comes to mind.

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Lt. Col. (ret) Roy Kamphausen, Senior Associate for Political and Security Affairs at NBR, reflected on the legacy of this great patriot in a conversation with Andrew Marble, founding editor of NBR’s journal Asia Policy, who is researching and writing a biography on General Shalikashvili.

The interview can be accessed here.

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